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Hundreds join Hike for Hospice

Hundreds join Hike for Hospice
Published on Monday, 2 May, 2016

It's called Stedman Community Hospice but for Elaine Schelhas it will always be the house of angels.

"Make that the awesome house of angels," Schelhas said Sunday prior to the annual Hike for Hospice. "They don't have volunteers or staff here.

"They have angels - people who help you get through the most difficult times."

It was one staff member in particular - Sandee McGahey - whose compassion and empathy will remain with Schelhas forever.

"My husband, Don, was only in the hospice for a couple of days," Schelhas said. "I remember the night when we knew that he was going to pass and Sandee told me that I could be here or go home - it was my choice.

"I went home but felt compelled to come back and, when I did, when I came into his room there was Sandee, holding his hand."

Don died in July of 2013. He was 63.

"I'm just so grateful to her and everyone at the hospice for what they did for me and my family and that Sandee was there with me when Don passed," Schelhas said, adding that the staff were also there back in 2008 when her sister, Carolyn Burnett, received her end-of-life care at the hospice.

Schelhas was one of many people to participate in the 12th annual Stedman Community Hike for Hospice on Sunday despite the cool, damp weather. When Schelhas arrived for Sunday's hike, one of the first people she met was McGahey. They hugged and shared a moment just like the many other families who participated in the hike.

The event raises money to support the many programs and services offered by the hospice, including an outreach program that provides end-of-life care to people in their homes. The hospice also provides educational and bereavement programs.

Organizers were thrilled to report that the hike raised $281,094, exceeding its fundraising goal of $280,000.

Although the weather was cloudy at the beginning of the walk, the parking lot at St. Joseph's Lifecare Centre was bright as walkers wore the yellow T-shirts that are synonymous with the event. Many families participated, including Evan's Army - family members and friends of Evan Leversage, the little boy whose battle with cancer brought together a community.

Evan, who was terminally ill with an inoperable brain tumour, inspired thousands to celebrate an early Christmas in St. George last October. Evan died on Dec. 6 at the hospice and his family has spoken about how the staff restore hope to those in despair.

Everyone participating in the hike had a story, including David Elkin.

Elkin, 82, is a volunteer with the hospice day program, as well as the men's bereavement program.

His daughter, Tara, who had been undergoing months of cancer treatment, received her end-of-life care at the hospice.

"She was born and raised in Brantford but was living out of town when she got sick," Elkin said. "She was getting treatment and I used to go visit her and help out when I could."

I tried to remain hopeful that she would beat the cancer but she looked at me and told me that her time was coming. I checked into it and they said the hospice is for people of Brantford and Brant County and their families and, because she was born and raised here, she could come to the hospice."

Elkin still remembers the day she arrived.

"She was dropped off at the hospice and then her husband came to get me so that we could go visit her together. I'll never forget it.

"When we got here, she was all settled in and when we walked into her room, she looked up, smiled, gave us a thumbs up and said 'I'm home.'"

Vball@postmedia.com

twitter.com/EXPVBall
Inspiring support for Stedman Community Hospice

Inspiring support for Stedman Community Hospice
Published on Friday,29 April, 2016

Written by Mike Peeling, Brant News
When Lesley Lehmann first came to Stedman Community Hospice's Hankinson House in Brantford, she didn't know what to expect and was at the lowest point in her life.
Along with family, she was there to say goodbye to her mother Shelley.
 
Shelley was only 56, but had been diagnosed with stage 4 brain cancer months before arriving at the hospice in the summer of 2015.
 
"I was very lonely and very vulnerable when I walked into the hospice," Lehmann said. "Someone was there to give me a hug, a cup of tea and a cookie. Someone sat with me and I felt more at ease than I had in almost a year."
 
Before that day, Lehmann was aware of Stedman Community Hospice - an end-of-life care facility available at no charge to residents of Brantford, Brant, Norfolk, Haldimand, Six Nations and New Credit - because of an aunt who volunteers there, but knew little else. Almost a year later, the one-of-a-kind palliative care facility has made an indelible impression on her and her family.
Shelley stayed in room 5 of Hankinson House, which opened in 2014 thanks to a successful fundraising campaign to build the $6.7 million, 10-bed facility to replace the original hospice.
 
To deliver the high level of care the hospice is known for, for people of all ages, with all kinds of terminal illnesses, St. Joseph's Lifecare Centre Foundation has a fundraising goal of $2.2 million annually, according president and CEO Olga Consorti.
 
Events such as Hike for Hospice, which raised $275,000 last year, are especially vital to helping achieve that goal because the hospice has no other source of funding, except for limited government funding for nursing costs.
 
"It's an incredible testament to the community," Consorti said. "We cannot not succeed. If we don't hit those targets, we'll end up having to close those beds."
 
"People often say to me, What's my little $20 donation going to do? Well we rely on this little donations. They really add up."
 
And Lehmann testifies to fact that all of the little donations pay off at the hospice.
 
"It's not a traditional sort of hospice," Lehmann said. "There's a layer of compassion to the staff and volunteers that allows families to be families there."
 
Now when Lehmann looks back at that first day in the hospice, she refers to it as "when we joined the family here."
 
Lehmann's father Jamie had been his wife's primary caregiver for six months before an ambulance took her to Hankinson House.
 
"It was obviously getting too difficult for my dad," she said.
 
Shelley had already benefitted from the hospice's outreach program in the form of a few visits from a home care nurse.
 
St. Joseph's Lifecare Centre, which runs the hospice along with a long-term care facility at the corner of Wayne Gretzky Parkway and Grey Street, has run the first-of-its-kind outreach program in Ontario since 2008 and made 300,000 home visits. The outreach program can send a physician, nurse and social support to a patient's home to provide pain and symptom management.  
 
"There's a lot our outreach program can do before a patient ever comes to the hospice," Consorti said, noting it offers grief counseling from the moment of diagnosis for patients dealing with all kinds of loss, such as the ability to work, drive or do regular activities.  
 
Lehmann says it's important for residents of not just Brantford but of Brant, Norfolk, Haldimand, Six Nations and New Credit to know about the outreach program and the hospice because they are available to them as well.
Shelley's son Matthew was due to get married after Shelley arrived at the hospice, and he wanted her to be a part of the big day.
 
So the family, hospice staff and volunteers all worked together to hold a ceremony for Matthew and his bride Kelly and a catered meal at the hospice.  
 
"It was a lovely day, so beautiful," Lehmann said. "It was perfect given the circumstances."
 
But miraculously, Shelley lived at the hospice for six months, which is "very unique," according to Consorti.
"Typically the longest a patient is with us is three months," she said. "The average is less than two weeks."
Consorti marveled at how Shelley rallied against her fatal condition for half a year at the hospice.
"I like to think it's because of the support she got here from the staff, volunteers and experts, and the help and love of her family," she said.
 
Lehmann said she worried about people's perception of her mother being in the hospice for so long, but wants people to understand her mother and family were blessed to have the hospice.
 
When Matthew's wedding day came around, Shelley wanted to be there, but was physically unable to leave the hospice. Instead, Lehmann's paternal aunt Christine Nechelput carried around an iPad throughout the ceremony, using video chat to let Shelley watch her son get married.
 
"The entire building was abuzz helping my mom get beautiful for the wedding," Lehmann said. "My mom felt very important that day. We were so relieved the staff and volunteers were there for her because we weren't able to be there as much."
 
Lehmann's family plans to be at the Hike for Hospice with a team called Williams Walkers, after Shelley's maiden name.
 
And Jamie continues to volunteer at the Stedman Community Hospice, particularly in the gardens. Jamie and Shelley Lehmann ran a greenhouse together for many of their 40 years together.
 
To participate or donate to the Hike for Hospice, visit stedmanhike.ca or call 519-751-7096 ext. 2475. Learn more at sjlc.ca
Evan's Army on March for Stedman Hospice

Evan's Army on March for Stedman Hospice
Published on Monday,18 April, 2016

Evan's Army will be marching in the upcoming Hike for Hospice in memory of a little boy who brought together a community.

The 12th annual hike will be held on Sunday, May 1, in support of Stedman Community Hospice, where seven-year-old Evan Leversage spent the last four weeks of his life.

Evan, who was terminally ill with an inoperable brain tumour, inspired thousands to celebrate an early Christmas in St. George last October. Evan died on Dec. 6 at the hospice.

"When you walk through the doors and feel like your hope is gone, they restore your hope," Evan's mother Nicole Wellwood said of hospice staff. "The nurses and staff are so tuned into your needs. Everything was looked after so I could just be a mom. They made sure our family had our time alone with Evan at the end without the chaos."

Hike for Hospice organizers are hoping to surpass last year's fundraising total of $275,133. Upward of 2,000 people are expected to participate.

Evan's family and friends hope to raise at least $7,000.

The hike includes a one-kilometre route around the neighbourhood of St. Joseph's Lifecare Centre, 99 Gretzky Pkwy., which participants are encouraged to do as many times as they wish.

Evan's early Christmas, complete with a parade and snow, attracted attention around the world through newspaper articles, television reports and social media. More than 7,000 people turned out for the parade and Christmas lights were put up in areas all across North America in tribute to the dying youngster.

Wellwood said hospice staff continued the holiday theme, letting Evan's family set up a Christmas tree in his room and creating space to pin up some of the hundreds of cards he received from well-wishers.

"Losing Evan left a big hole in this family," said Wellwood. "We're working hard to continue his legacy."

At Easter, Wellwood and her family hosted a dinner for oncology in-patients at Hamilton's McMaster Hospital. An effort called Evan's Legacy has raised more than $70,000 for brain cancer research. There is even preliminary work being done on a children's book about the St. George boy.

Wellwood said Evan's Army, which will include his brothers, Logan, 9, and Tyson, 5, is welcoming others to join the team.

"We want the community to join us - to walk in honour of Evan or of someone else they care about."

The annual hike is the only fundraising event done for the hospice.

"Our goal has always been to ensure that no hospice patients or family ever gets a bill for the care they so desperately need and deserve," said Olga Consorti, president and CEO of St. Joseph's Lifecare Foundation. "We combine all the efforts of our staff, volunteers and sponsors to have one incredible event for the community."

Hikers who register and raise $50 in pledges will be entered into two early bird draws. One draw was held March 24. The second one will be held April 22. Prizes include a gym membership, a Fitbit, and a 40-inch flat screen TV. Participants must register by April 21 to be entered into the draw.

There are also prizes for top fundraisers, including a choice of a $1,500 gift certificate for a vacation package donated by Goliger's Travel Plus or a Via Rail voucher valued at $1,750 for a return trip for four anywhere between Brantford and Montreal.

Sharp Bus Lines is donating buses to shuttle hikers from Lynden Park Mall to the hike site. Everyone who parks at the mall will be entered into a draw for a $250 mall gift card.

Anyone who collects $100 or more in pledges will be entered into a draw to win a 48-inch flat screen TV. Hikers also will receive a limited edition pair of Hike Sunglasses for every $250 they collect, along with a ballot to win other prizes.

Hike festivities begin at 1 p.m. on Sunday, May 1 with a Celebration of Life service to honour those lost and those who are living with a life-threatening illness.

Early registration and check-in is set for Saturday, April 30, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the St. Joe's parking lot at 99 Wayne Gretzky Pkwy., off of Chatham Street, where the hike begins and ends. Pre-registration is encouraged at www.stedmanhike.ca. Donations also can be made online.

The registration fee for all hikers is $20, which includes a hike T-shirt and barbecue after the event.

Registration on hike day, May 1, starts at 11 a.m. The hike begins at 1 p.m.

mruby@postmedia.com

Laurier Students Support Hospice

Laurier Students Support Hospice
Published on Wednesday,13 April, 2016

Laurier Day of Humour in support of the Stedman Community Hospice

Laurier Day of Humour in support of the Stedman Community Hospice
Published on Thursday,31 March, 2016

Councillors want more funding for hospice beds

Councillors want more funding for hospice beds
Published on Monday,28 March, 2016

City councillors are calling on the provincial government to increase funding to support the opening of four more beds at the Hankinson House hospice.

Councillors voted in favour of a resolution calling for the additional funding at a committee meeting of the whole on Tuesday. The resolution will come before councillors for a final vote at a city council meeting next week.

The resolution was brought forward by Ward 3 Coun. Dan McCreary, who noted that only six of the available 10 beds at the hospice are currently being used.

More than $6 million was raised by the St. Joseph's Lifecare Foundation, including $1.25 million from the city and $1 million from the Hankinson family, to build Hankinson House.

In addition to the building, funds raised in the community are used to pay for the staff who oversee the hospice, utility bills and food. Funding for nursing and personal support workers comes from the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care. The ministry approved funding for six hospice beds in 2005.

Meanwhile, the provincial government has conducted a review of end-of-life care in the province.

In its 2016 budget, the province is proposing to invest an additional $75 million over three years to give patients more options and access to palliative and end-of-life care, said Derrick Bernardo, president of St. Joseph's Lifecare Centre, which operates the hospice.

The investment includes funding support for up to 20 new hospices across Ontario and increased funding for existing facilities, he added.

St. Joseph's officials are working with Brant MPP Dave Levac on obtaining funding for the additional beds.

Hankinson House was built to increase the number of hospice beds available in response to an increase in demand. As well, there has been an increase in demand from the community for the day wellness, grief and bereavement and outreach services offered by the hospice.

One wing of Hankinson House is being used for additional day wellness programming, patient/family meetings and clinical education.

"We are anxiously awaiting news of funding so we may utilize this wing for much-needed patient care to meet the identified need in our community," Bernardo said.

Vball@postmedia.com

twitter.com/EXPVBall
Hike for Hospice has $275,000 goal

Hike for Hospice has $275,000 goal
Published on Monday,21 March, 2016

 
BRANTFORD - Online registrations are being accepted for the 12th annual Hike for Hospice on Sunday, May 1 in support of Stedman Community Hospice.

Organizers are hoping to surpass last year's fundraising total of $275,133. Upward of 2,000 people are expected to participate.

The hike includes a one-kilometre route around the neighbourhood of St. Joseph's Lifecare Centre, 99 Gretzky Parkway, which participants are encouraged to do as many times as they wish.

New this year is a $1,000 top team prize donated by the Keg Steakhouse and a $100 toy store gift certificate for the top youth prize.

"Our goal has always been to ensure that no hospice patients or family ever gets a bill for the care they so desperately need and deserve," said Olga Consorti, president and CEO of St. Joseph's Lifecare Foundation. "Even though the hike is a one-day event, we work on it throughout the year as it's the only fundraising event we do for the hospice.

"That way we combine all the efforts of our staff, volunteers and sponsors to have one incredible event for the community."

Hikers who register and raise $50 in pledges will be entered into two Early Bird draws to be held March 24 and April 22. Prizes include a gym membership, a Fitbit, and a 40-inch flat screen TV. Participants must register by March 23 and raise $50 in pledges to be entered into both Early Bird Draws or by April 21 to be entered into the second draw only.

There are also prizes for top fundraisers, including a choice of a $1,500 gift certificate for a vacation package donated by Goliger's Travel Plus or a Via Rail voucher valued at $1,750 for a return trip for four anywhere between Brantford and Montreal.

Sharp Bus Lines are donating their buses to shuttle hikers from Lynden Park Mall to the hike site. Everyone who parks at the mall will be entered into a draw for a $250 mall gift card.

Anyone who collects $100 or more in pledges will be entered into a draw to win a 48-inch flat screen TV. Hikers will also receive a limited edition pair of Hike Sunglasses for every $250 they collect, along with a ballot to win other prizes.

Hike festivities begin at 1 p.m. on Sunday, May 1 with a Celebration of Life service to honour those lost and those who are living with a life-threatening illness.

Early registration and check-in is set for Saturday, April 30 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the St. Joe's parking lot at 99 Wayne Gretzky Parkway off of Chatham Street, where the hike begins and ends. Pre-registration is encouraged at www.stedmanhike.ca. The registration fee for all hikers is $20, which includes a hike T-shirt and barbecue after the event.

Registration on hike day, May 1, starts at 11 a.m. The hike begins at 1 p.m.
 
Expositor Staff
Early Birds Get the Prizes!

Early Birds Get the Prizes!
Published on Thursday,10 March, 2016

Brant News
By Sean Allen

Organizers of Brantford’s 12th annual Hike for Hospice are dangling some carrots to encourage participants to sign up and start raising money early for the May 1 fundraiser.

Hikers who register and collect $50 in pledges before March 24 or April 22 are eligible for early-bird draw prizes worth more than $500.

"The hospice is the brainchild of this community and we are so thankful that there are people out there who believe in it so much that they are willing to donate to bring this special project to life,” St. Joseph’s Lifecare Foundation president Olga Consorti said.

St. Joseph’s Lifecare Centre funds and operates the brand new $6.7-million Hankinson House hospice in the community. The new building opened in 2014 to replace the Stedman Community Hospice, which has operated since 2006.

Online registrations are now being accepted at www.StedmanHike.ca and in-person registrations can be done at the St. Joseph’s Lifecare Foundation office, 99 Wayne Gretzky Parkway.

Those registered with $50 pledged before March 23 will be eligible for the first early-bird draw for a one-year gym membership to the Brantford Fitness Centre and a Fitbit activity tracker.

They will also be eligible for the second early-bird draw, along with other registrants with $50 before April 21, for a 40-inch flat screen TV from FM Audio.

Sponsors continue to help drive the incentive for participants to raise money.

The top fundraiser for the Hike for Hospice will receive a $1,500 gift certificate from Goliger’s Travel Plus or a VIA Rail roundtrip for four anywhere between Brantford and Montreal.

New this year is a $1,000 top team prize donated by the Keg Steakhouse and a $100 toy store gift certificate for the top fundraising youth.

"We hope the community continues to rise to the challenge to help us keep the hospice doors open and the love and care abundant,” Consorti said. "Hikers securing pledges or making donations of their own are a vital part of our success, coupled with our incredible sponsors for the day."

The hike, in which participants will walk a one-kilometre circuit around the St. Joseph’s Lifecare Centre neighbourhood, raised $275,133 last year with more than 1,000 participants all wearing the event’s signature yellow T-shirts. There are other raffle prizes available for top fundraisers, including Toronto Raptors tickets.

"Our goal has always been to ensure that no hospice patients or family ever gets a bill for the care they so desperately need and deserve,” Consorti said. "Even though the hike is a one day event, we work on it throughout the year as it’s the only fundraising event we do for the hospice.

"That way, we combine all the efforts of our staff, volunteers and sponsors to have one incredible event for the community, with the hope that everyone comes through for us to help us meet our demanding fundraising needs for programs and services not funded by the government.”

The event typically draws heavy traffic to the area of Wayne Gretzky Parkway at Chatham Street, so the hospice is grateful for Sharp Bus Lines' donation of free shuttle buses. During the day of the walk, buses will be running between the event and Lynden Park Mall to allow participants to park off-site. The buses will run from 10:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. and those who take advantage of the shuttles will be entered into a draw for a $250 Lynden Park Mall gift card.

Hike festivities will begin at 1 p.m. on Sunday, May 1, with a celebration of live service for those who died at the hospice and those living with life-threatening illness.

The registration for the hike is $20 and includes a hike T-shirt and post-hike barbecue.

Pre-hike check-ins are encouraged on Saturday, April 30, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. in order to reduce lineups on the day of the event. Registration on the day of the hike begins at 11 a.m.

Organizers will have family-friendly activities on offer throughout the day, including rides, face painting and craft areas.

For more information, contact St. Joseph’s Lifecare Foundation at 519-751-7096, ext. 2475, or visit www.StedmanHike.ca online for more details.
Hospice officials hopeful for funding - Expositor Feb 23, 2016

Hospice officials hopeful for funding - Expositor Feb 23, 2016
Published on Tuesday,23 February, 2016

Officials at St. Joseph Lifecare Centre are hoping to get good news in the next couple of months concerning unused beds at the new Hankinson House hospice.

"I know that the ministry wanted to take a really close look at hospice care and wanted to work out a plan on end-of-life care for the province," Derrick Bernardo, president of St. Joseph's Lifecare Centre and the Stedman Community Hospice, which operates Hankinson House.

"It's my understanding that the review (of end-of-life care) has been done and is now in the hands of the parliamentary secretary to (Health) Minister Eric Hoskins. We remain hopeful and, in the meantime, the building is being fully utilized."

In addition to end-of-life care, the hospice offers a range of services, including an outreach program that provides end-of-life care to the people in their homes and educational and bereavement programs.

At issue is that only six of the 10 beds at Hankinson House are being used.

Construction of the $6.7-million Hankinson House was completed with funds raised in the community by St. Joseph's Lifecare Foundation. Community funding is also used to pay for the core workers who oversee the hospice, plus utility bills and food.

However, the provincial government pays for nursing and personal support workers staff. The Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care approved six residential beds for the hospice in 2005.

St. Joseph's. in response to community need for more end-of-life care service, developed and followed through on plans to expand their services and increase the number of residential beds to 10 from six.

Provincial government officials have pointed out that St. Joseph's undertook construction of Hankinson House on its own.

St. Joseph's officials have continued to lobby the provincial government for additional funding.

"We're grateful for the support we have received from the community, the City of Brantford and our provincial representative MPP Dave Levac," Bernardo said. "Everyone has been very supportive and we're hoping to have some news within the next couple of months."

Meanwhile, Ward 3 Coun. Dan McCreary wants city council to voice its support for provincial funding for the hospice.

McCreary has filed a notice of motion calling on the province to "honour the Stedman Community Hospice Hankinson House by increasing funding to permit the opening of four beds now shuttered due to underfunding."

The notice of motion is due to be introduced at Tuesday's meeting of city council. It will be put on the agenda for further discussion at a future committee-of-the-whole meeting.

McCreary said he became aware of the issue when a friend, who received end-of-life care at Hankinson House, died. People remarked on the excellent care she received and noted that more people could be helped if funding was available to open the four beds.

In his motion, McCreary noted that St. Joseph's foundation raised from the community more than $6 million, including $1.25 million from the municipality and $1 million from the Hankinson family.

"Of all the things the provincial government spends money on, I have to think that this has got to be at or near the top of their list in terms of priorities," McCreary said. "This is something that's important to a lot of people in this community."

vincent.ball@sunmedia.ca

twitter.com/EXPVBall

Hundreds Attend Funeral for Evan

Hundreds Attend Funeral for Evan
Published on Thursday,10 December, 2015

Brantford Expositor

Susan Gamble  susan.gamble@sunmedia.ca

Instead, more than 7,000 turned out for a huge parade and Christmas lights were put up in spots around North America in tribute to the dying youngster.

"How on earth could a little seven-year-old do so much living?" asked Barna. "Maclean's magazine has said he was the boy who moved Christmas! Who can do that?"

Barna called on the St. George community to make an annual effort to put up Christmas lights each year during the week of Oct. 24 in memory of Evan.

Aunt Ashley Agar said that there is something about Evan that made people want to bend rules and step out of their comfort zones.

"He had a tough road to walk but never cried or complained about his lot in life. He was completely average and totally magical. That's our Evan."

Evan's mother, Nicole Wellwood thanked the community who gave her son such joy during his last months.

"We couldn't have done it without this community."

Part of that community help came from the Stedman Community Hospice in Brantford, where Evan died. He had been in hospice care since Nov. 4.

Hospice staff and volunteers not only took care of Evan and his family over the last few weeks, but also dealt with the outpouring of interest in the boy's case.

"It was an incredible experience to field media requests from around the world," said Olga Consorti, the president and CEO of St. Joseph's Lifecare Foundation, which is the fundraising organization for the hospice and the St. Joseph's Lifecare Centre. "Overall, everyone was pretty respectful of the family's wishes."

Hospice executive director Cheryl Moore said she found Evan to be "beyond his years."

"Evan lived more life and experienced more love than some people do in 90 years."

During the funeral, Evan's longtime paramedic friend, Jeff Sager, a platoon commander at Perth County Emergency Medical Services, announced to great applause that he had communicated with Gov.-Gen. David Johnston and arranged for Evan to receive a miniature replica of his own Governor-General's award.

Sager asked Evan's brother, Logan, to receive the award on behalf of his brother.

In a brief address to the media following the funeral, Evan's mother spoke on behalf of the more than 10,000 Canadian children who are battling cancer.

"I pray he can make a difference," Wellwood said.

The family has established Evan's Legacy in partnership with the Brain Tumour Foundation of Canada and urge funds to be donated to help find the cause of and a cure for brain tumours, at www.braintumour.ca/5528/evans-legacy.

After the funeral, white-gloved pallbearers carried and then wheeled Evan's casket to the adjacent cemetery, past a line of firefighters with helmets over their hearts and OPP officers saluting beside their motorcycles.

At the graveside, the pallbearers removed their white gloves and laid them atop the casket, each set held down by a rose.

Then people were invited to release a balloon as a final farewell to Evan.



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