News

SC Johnson donates $500,000 to the Stedman Community Hospice Hankinson House

SC Johnson donates $500,000 to the Stedman Community Hospice Hankinson House
Published on Friday,21 April, 2017

SC Johnson lighting the way for grieving families

News Apr 20, 2017 by Victoria Gray, Brant News

SC Johnson donated $500,000 to the Stedman Community Hospice Hankinson House and the SC Johnson Way wing of the hospice was unveiled Thursday at the hospice on Grey Street. From left General manager SC Johnson Chris Moeller, Ron Webb with his wife Ruth Webb who is currently a resident and Elsie Hankinson, the hospices' namesake who donated $1 million from the Lorne and Elsie Hankinson Charitable Foundation in 2012. - Victoria Gray/Metroland

Ruth Webb doesn't know how much longer she has, but she's glad to spend the reminder of her days at Stedman Community Hospice Hankinson House.

"You couldn't find a better place,” she said. "You can tell this isn't just a job for them, it's a calling.”

The Port Dover resident has cancer in her left eye and in her lungs that has metastasized, but she and her husband Ron say they are glad to be welcomed to the hospice.

"I wouldn't want to be anywhere else, well I would, but under the circumstance,” she joked. "It's a lovely place. I say this is heaven's waiting room and heaven has some shoes to fill.”

SC Johnson Canada donated $500,000 to the hospice this month and the SJ Johnson Way wing was unveiled on Thursday during a celebration and tour of the hospice.

Olga Consorti, president and CEO of St. Joseph's Lifecare Centre said staff chose the name because of the company's philosophy of giving back and long history of supporting the community.

"It is SC Johnson's way to help out and we really appreciate that,” she said.

During a reception before the unveiling Chris Moeller, general manager of SC Johnson Canada, and executive director of the hospice Cheryl Moore lit a candle together to signify their partnership and lighting the way for others together, while maintaining their own glow.

"When we light the way for others it does not extinguish our own flame, it just makes the world a brighter place,” Consorti said.

Moeller said no matter what country SC Johnson has operated in, it contributes to the local community because it's something it believes in.

"We've heard so many inspiring stories from employee volunteers and employees who have unfortunately, had to use the hospice that people feel loved, supported and empowered. I think these are really powerful words,” he said. "These things don't happen without vision, resources and time from community members.”
Ready to take a hike?

Ready to take a hike?
Published on Friday, 7 April, 2017

May 7 Fundraiser key to operation of Stedman Community Hospice.
      In the Photo taken by Brian Thompson/The Expositor St. Joseph's Lifecare Foundation CEO Olga Consorti uses a selfie-stick to take a picture with Darrin Miller and his daughter, Daneka, on Thursday at the Stedman Community Hospice. The Millers lost their wife and mother, Cindy, to a brain tumour last month. They will be among those taking part in the annual Hike for Hospice fundraiser on May 7. Selfie-sticks will be given to participants who raise $250.

 
Cindy Miller knew in January she wouldn't be alive long enough to see her daughter graduate from Grade 8.

It was her dying wish to be with 13-year-old Daneka to celebrate the milestone event.

Staff at the Stedman Community Hospice, where Miller, who was suffering a brain tumour spent the last weeks of her life, were committed to making that happen.

In a single day, they organized a graduation ceremony that included 10 of Daneka's North Ward School classmates and a group of teachers. They helped the young grads get dresses and corsages, decorated the hospice family room in the school colours of navy blue, white and gold, and brought in homemade baked goods.

They did Miller's hair and makeup and wheeled in her bed so she could be part of the day.

"She couldn't talk but she knew what was going on," said Darrin Miller, Cindy's husband of 20 years. "It was very emotional for her. "It was her last wish and, once the graduation was over, you could tell she was satisfied."

Miller, an elementary teacher who lived in Paris, died on March 10 at the age of 43.

It's not unusual for staff at the hospice, which is operated by the St. Joseph's Lifecare Centre, to make end-of-life wishes come true for their patients.

"This was our first graduation, but we've had weddings and birthdays here," said Olga Consorti, president and CEO of St. Joseph's Lifecare Foundation. "We want to ensure patients live before they die."

Grateful to the hospice staff who looked after Miller for six weeks and who became more like family than caregivers, Darrin Miller, Daneka and a huge team of supporters will be among the walkers in the 13th annual Hike for Hospice on Sunday, May 7.

Last year, more than 1,500 hike participants raised $281,000. This year, Consorti said they're hoping to surpass that.

"The success of the hike is vital to our ability to offset hospice programming to ensure that no patient or family ever gets a bill for the care they need and deserve," said Consorti.

It is the only fundraiser organized by the hospice. The rest of the facility's operating expenses - between $1.5 million and $2 million a year - come from corporate contributions, personal donations and memorial donations.

Only a portion of nursing care at the hospice is offset by government funding, said Consorti. Utility costs, medical equipment, furnishings, food and other expenses are all covered through community funding.

"The hospice is one of the biggest community treasures," said Consorti. "It is funded by the community for the community."

The Hike for Hospice includes a one-kilometre route around the St. Joseph's neighbourhood at Wayne Gretzky Parkway and Grey Street, which participants are encouraged to do as many times as they wish.

This year, hospice staff will celebrate Canada's 150th anniversary with a commemorative hike T-shirt. There are also early bird draw prizes for anyone who registers and raises $100 or more by April 27. Prizes include white gold sapphire and diamond earrings, a 40-inch television and men's designer sunglasses.

Top fundraisers will be able to choose from prizes, including a $1,500 travel gift certificate donated by Goliger's Travel Plus, or a $2,000 travel voucher donated by Via Rail. The top fundraising team will get a $1,000 gift certificate donated by The Keg Steakhouse, and top youth will get a $100 gift certificate for toys.

Sharp Bus Lines is donating the use of buses so hike participants can park at the Lynden Park Mall. The shuttle will run from 11 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. on hike day. Everyone who parks at the mall will be entered into a draw for a $250 mall gift card.

Everyone who collects $250 will get a selfie photo stick. Hikers will receive a ballot to be entered into several draws for donated prizes, including gift cards, a gym membership, a television, a gift basket, and a junior B 99ers season pass.

The hike begins at 1 p.m. with a celebration of life service to honour lost lives and those living with life-threatening illness.

Early bird registration day is Saturday, May 6, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the St. Joe's parking lot at 99 Wayne Gretzky Pkwy, where the hike begins and ends.

Consorti said everyone is encouraged to pre-register, to reduce lineups on hike day, at www.stedmanhike.ca and come to the early bird with their pledges.

The registration fee for hikers is $20, which includes a T-shirt, barbecue and festivities.

Registration on hike day starts at 11 a.m.

More information is available at www.stedmanhike.ca or by contacting Michelle Biro by telephone at 519-751-7096, ext. 2475, or by email at mbiro@sjlc.ca.
Showing support for Brantford's hospice

Showing support for Brantford's hospice
Published on Tuesday,31 January, 2017

Victoria Gray, Brant News
Debbie Clayton knows tragedy can strike anyone of any age at any time.
In that difficult time, she wants families to know they have the support of the community behind them making sure that at Stedman Community Hospice families, not just patients, are taken care of.
"Families can stay at the hospice and get fed while your loved one is there,” she said. "So they don't have to go home.”
Clayton hopes the third annual Hugs for Hospice helps keep families together and taken care of in their time of need at Stedman.
The fundraiser is Feb. 4 at the Gunners' Club on Henry Street. The doors open at 5 p.m. for a sit down roast beef dinner, live and silent auctions, a dance and a buffet at 10 p.m.
To date, the fundraiser has given more than $10,000 to the hospice and are shooting to raise $10,000 this year.
"It's supposed to be a happy event,” she said. "People want to be remembered definitely, but they don't want you to be sad.”
Nicole Wellwood, Evan Leversage's, mother will give a speech about the hospice and how it affected her life during seven year old Leversage's last days with an inoperable brain tumour two years ago after the St. George community gave the family an early Christmas.
There will be a Sponge Bob Square Pants placed on a table and all donations left will go to the hospice in memory of Leversage.
Matt Cummings, owner of StillWaters Plate and Pour and the Cobblestone Pub House and Clayton started the fundraiser after Clayton's battle with cancer. Four years ago she was diagnosed with stage four melanoma and a few months later breast cancer. After countless chemotherapy sessions, more than 30 days of radiation, 11 surgeries and more, she's still alive to tell the tale, when many friends are not.
"My view on life has changed so much,” she said. "This is a way for me to give back and help other people.”
The live auction has two West Jet tickets to anywhere they fly, a restaurant tree with more than $500 in gift certificates, a spa tree with over $500 in gift certificates and much more.
"It's a great cause,” she said. "They make you feel very comfortable.”

Stedman Hospice offers 'compassion' along final journey
Published on Monday,23 January, 2017

| By Jeff Tribe

If Peter Slaman were to sum up his experience with Stedman Community Hospice in a single word, it might well be ‘compassion.’

"Unbelievable,” said the Port Dover resident Wednesday afternoon during the facility’s Norfolk Community Outreach Office Open House at 23 Market St. "Everyone in that place seemed to have that care for another person, ‘What can we do for you, how can we ease your pain?’

"That applies from the nurses right down to the lady at the front door who signed you in.”

Slaman’s path to Stedman began in December, 2014 when his wife Veronica ("Everyone knew her as Ronnie,”) experienced eyesight issues and began suffering constant headaches. During their March, 2015 trip to Spain, Ronnie was stumbling over things and lost her peripheral vision, leading to a CAT scan in April, which came back negative.

But by July, 2015 with her speech slurred and both suspecting a stroke, the couple visited Norfolk General Hospital. More detailed tests revealed a growth on her brain, identified as cancerous through a subsequent operation in Hamilton.

Given best estimates of between four months and two years to live and transferred back to Simcoe post-operation, Ronnie, realizing her condition was terminal, elected to return home as soon as possible. While there, a doctor had mentioned the possibility of a hospice in passing and in September, 2015 she was referred to an outreach team.

Peter, his two daughters, Ronnie’s sister and CCAC staff combined to provide home care through that fall and into the winter.

"Without them, I would not have been able to do it for sure.”

Slaman also spoke to the value of support throughout this journey, how much he appreciated a visit or a phone call from a friend or family member.

Peter found the toughest part of providing care for a person you are emotionally involved is seeing them suffer. Early in January, 2016, CCAC staff suggested it might be time to consider the hospice. Dr. Robin Martin-Godelie performed an assessment with a nurse, and when a bed opened up two days later (January 13), Ronnie was moved to Stedman in Brantford. She relaxed immediately, says Peter, almost as if she had accepted the final stage of her journey.

"It’s the biggest relief knowing that she was looked after, she was at peace.”

Ronnie passed Saturday, January 30, 2016.

"She was at peace during those last 17 days,” says her husband. There was no such thing as a hospice for his parents, the level of service provided unavailable, up to and including a post-death visit with his family from Stedman Supportive Care Clinician Maureen Russell.

"I think a hospice is a very, very important part of medical care. A person who is in their final days needs different care.”

Slaman shared his story, although difficult and emotional in the retelling, during the Norfolk Community Outreach Office Open House in support of others in the future, continued service whose value is most evident to those who have already taken the journey.

"The need is so obvious once you’ve gone through it. I think every person should have the opportunity, should this time of life come, that these services are there.”
Palliative care has many rewards

Palliative care has many rewards
Published on Friday,16 December, 2016

Colleen Toms
Brant News  |  Dec 15, 2016
STEDMAN COMMUNITY HOSPICE
In Photo: Stedman Community Hospice registered nurse Tara Young, left, residential care co-ordinator Jennifer Dennis and student nurse Stephanie VanderValk are part of the team who make a patient's final days easier.

A day in the life of a Stedman Community Hospice caregiver is anything but typical.

"There are times my husband will ask me ‘so what have you got planned for the day’ and I say ‘I have no idea,’ because the days are so unpredictable,” said residential care co-ordinator Jennifer Dennis.

Dennis is in charge of assessing patients and co-ordinating their admission to the hospice.

Many of the admissions are recommended by the Stedman Community Hospice outreach program and Dennis will then visit with the patient and family in their home or in the hospital.

"That’s when you have that difficult conversation about how things have been at home and how hospice care could benefit them and their family,” Dennis said. "For the families there’s a tremendous amount of relief to know the burden of care is being shifted now onto professional caregivers.

"In spite of the wonderful job they’ve done, they need time now just to be at the bedside.”

Some patients will have already expressed a desire to spend their final days at the hospice while for some, knowing they are leaving their home for the last time and that their journey is coming to an end can be distressing.

"I would say it’s probably the most difficult decision that patients and families ever make, just to accept that,” said hospice executive director Cheryl Moore.

For Dennis, making the decision as to which patient would benefit most from care in the hospice setting isn’t easy, either.

"Sometimes it’s the needs of the family more than the patient,” Moore said. "When it’s a young mom or dad too, I just pray that we have a bed because we have to look at the children and where is the best environment in this situation that they can be in.

"I don’t believe there’s any other setting that can wrap their arms around a family and support them like hospice can.”

As difficult as working in palliative care can be, it can also be very rewarding.

"You don’t intend to go into it, you just happen upon it and once you happen upon it you realize, this is the most meaningful work I’ve ever done and it allows you to be the nurse that you always imagined that you could be,” Dennis said.

For registered nurse Tara Young, providing 24/7 hands-on care enables her to personalize care for each individual patient.

"Our staff really tries hard to get to know who that person is they’re looking after so they will fine-tune that care,” Young said. "It’s having the person define their goals and wishes for end-of-life care and then changing our ways and trying to accommodate their wishes. It’s about them.”

When working in palliative care nurses need to be flexible and open to treating patients in ways that may not be typical.

"We want it to be as homey as it can be for them and to keep their routines the same,” Young said. "We had a patient who had a Sunday night football family event and that was his last event. We try to make it very personal for them.”

There are times when rules are broken – for instance some patients may want an ice cream sundae for breakfast or a homemade apple pie - and hospice staff will go out of their way to fulfill their wishes.

Walking into a room and seeing a smile on the face of a patient is often all the reward nurses need.

"Just to know that they are comfortable, that is the best feeling,” Young said.

Nurses often establish bonds with patients, which can make it more difficult when the patient dies.

"Friendships evolve, it’s hard not to build those friendships, so even in grief and in mourning it helps to keep in touch with the families sometimes,” Young said. "The support of staff is also very helpful.”

Student nurse Stephanie VanderValk said patient care revolves more around personal comfort in palliative care.

"It’s more supportive care,” she said. "It’s really humbling, that’s what I’ve found, and rewarding for sure.

"Even when they do pass away it’s sad, but you also have to think that it’s what the patient wanted at that time.”

VanderValk had a personal experience with hospice care, which helped steer her in that direction for her career.

"It was the type of care – (nurses are) not wearing uniforms and it has every feel of a home,” she said. "It doesn’t have the beeps, the sounds and it gives the family time to be a wife, to be a daughter, to be a son and not that caregiver that they are at home.

"It’s kind of like a beautiful thing here.”
Palliative Headquarters in Port Dover

Palliative Headquarters in Port Dover
Published on Friday, 9 December, 2016

The Stedman Community Hospice in Brantford has opened an extension office in Port Dover. Among those on hand for the official opening Thursday was Dr. Robin Martin-Godelie, seated, a palliative care physician serving Norfolk County. In back, from left, are Bob Pomeroy of the Port Dover Lions, Stedman executive director Cheryl Moore, and Ross Gowan of the Rotary Club of Norfolk Sunrise. MONTE SONNENBERG/SIMCOE REFORMER

A structured approach to end-of-life care is finally taking shape in Norfolk County.

Prior to Dec. 1, Norfolk families needing palliative care turned to the Stedman Community Hospice in Brantford and its roving team of clinicians.

Today – thanks to generous contributions from the Port Dover Lions and the Rotary Club of Norfolk Sunrise – the Stedman hospice has an extension office in Port Dover.

The service clubs acted due to growing demand and the pressure this is placing on front-line medical workers. The Lions and Rotarians decided it was unacceptable for these professionals to be performing such sensitive and important work out of their cars and in coffee shops.

With ongoing support from the community, the Lions and Rotarians see the Port Dover office as the first step in the development of a network of centres supporting families and health-care workers devoted to palliative care.

"It takes a community to look after the fragile,” Ross Gowan, chair of the Lions-Rotary committee that headed up the initiative, said at the office’s dedication in Port Dover Thursday.

"It’s not just up to the health-care system. The vision I have is one of a community that wraps itself around those who need palliative care like a giant hug. We’re delighted to be part of that. The next step is to bring in the rest of the community to make this initiative grow.”

Bob Pomeroy echoed similar sentiments on behalf of the Port Dover Lions.

"From acorns great oaks grow,” Pomeroy said. "This is something I hope spreads and grows much bigger across Norfolk.”

The Stedman Community Hospice currently serves 600 patients and family members in Brantford, Brant County, Haldimand, Norfolk, Six Nations and New Credit. Nearly a third of this caseload is based in Norfolk, with 12 new cases from Norfolk alone referred to Stedman last week.

"The need is so great,” Stedman executive director Cheryl Moore said at Thursday’s event. "What makes death any less important than birth? The government is finally beginning to realize that end-of-life care is an important aspect of the health-care system.”

Dr. Robin Martin-Godelie, of Simcoe, is the palliative specialist serving Norfolk County. The doctor and her team are able to serve the community in a more orderly and efficient manner now that they have a base of operation for receiving clients.

"I want to extend a sincere `Thank you,’” Dr. Martin-Godlie said to the Lions and the Rotarians. "You’ve made our lives a whole lot easier.”

Derrick Bernardo, president of the St. Joseph’s Life-Care Centre – the administrative group overseeing the Stedman hospice – said this is the first time in Ontario that private organizations have marshalled their resources to provide palliative care in the community.

"Feel free to brag about that,” he said. "Your partnership has not gone unnoticed by the St. Joseph’s health-care community. You have brought care closer to home.”

The Stedman extension office is located in Suite 7 of the professional building at 23 Market Street West. The Port Dover Lions and Rotary of Norfolk Sunrise are committed to supporting the office for at least two years. Beyond that, it will be up to the community to support the venue through donations and fundraising campaigns.

msonnenberg@postmedia.com
Hospice provides peace

Hospice provides peace
Published on Thursday,10 November, 2016

Brant News
By Colleen Toms

After a hard-fought, three-year battle with cancer, Robert (Quinn) Quinlan is ready to accept his fate. Yet he is doing so with feelings of peace and contentment.

For the past three weeks Quinn has been a resident at Hankinson House in the Stedman Community Hospice. For Quinn, it feels more like a five-star hotel.

"It’s an enlightening experience,” Quinn said. "I had no idea that this place was available. I had no idea that the service provided would be so exceptional and it was really a dream come true to come here. The people are just wonderful.

"I’m delighted to be here.”

Quinn – an executive chef by trade – spent 25 years in South Florida and worked in Naples, where he spent five years at the Ritz Carlton Hotel in charge of the kitchen that fed hundreds of people every week.

"He draws a comparison to the hospice here as being like a five-star hotel,” said Quinn’s brother Tom.

The freedoms the hospice affords, such as sleeping in, watching his favourite television programs, being able to eat whatever he feels like when he feels like it, and having family and friends come and go as they please, help to make the surroundings feel very much like home for Quinn.

"We get to pace ourselves,” he said.

Friendly and caring staff and volunteers are always at the ready to assist Quinn whenever needed.

"He would probably say the staff (are his favourite),” Tom said.

"I see the same thing – happy people, always a smile on their face, they can’t do enough for you. You don’t even get close to a frown around here from anybody.”

Tom – who served as his brother’s caretaker at home with the help of the hospice outreach team for the past six months – is also thrilled that Quinn is now enjoying his last days in peace and comfort at the hospice.

"My greatest fear was him getting up in the middle night and going to the washroom because he’s had a couple of falls,” Tom said. "That worry for me is removed by him being here because he is under constant watch.”

Rather than having to ensure Quinn receives his medications and proper doses on time and keeping a constant watch when he is up and about, Tom and sister Elspeth Gowrie can now sit and relax with Quinn.

"I was so impressed when I first came to visit,” Gowrie said. "I said, ‘I could live here too.’”

Time is spent laughing, reminiscing, hosting friends, relaxing in the beautiful gardens, quietly watching television while Quinn naps or going on "road trips” with Tom.

The beautiful surroundings of the hospice, both inside and out, enhance an atmosphere of warmth and comfort. When Quinn’s son and daughter visit they can play in the games room, enjoy a bowl of soup or indulge in a home-baked treat prepared by hospice volunteers.

"Everything is so bright in here, between the windows and the colour of the walls,” Tom said. "It’s everything that you would think that a hospice is not. You come into a place and think this is going to be kind of depressing but it’s the polar opposite.”

While Quinn doesn’t have the strength he once had when he was healthy, he hopes to be a role model for his friends and family with his upbeat and positive attitude.

"I don’t have a lot of strength anymore but maybe I can help in other directions,” Quinn said. "All we can do is one day at a time.”

Quinn is given additional peace of mind knowing that after he is gone, his loved ones will continue to receive support from the many services the hospice provides.

"This is like coming home every day,” Tom said. "I look forward to coming up here, not just to see Quinn, but to also see everybody else … It lifts you up.

"I would encourage people to come here just to see the place because they would be sold right away, and that would be incentive or motivation to people to support the hospice.”

Creating Gardens That Bring Peace

Creating Gardens That Bring Peace
Published on Tuesday, 6 September, 2016

Working in the gardens at Stedman House Community Hospice's Hankinson House isn't like any other job Meagan Bains has ever had.

"It's not like a job. It's not stressful,” she said. "Everyone is so nice here it's almost like Disney World, I can't explain it really.”

The 19-year-old Mohawk College student worked alongside Justin Leach, 17, and Blakeley Boakes, 17, in the gardens, expanding, deadheading, watering, installing flagstone path ways and much more this summer. Horticultural therapist Lynn Leach taught them about plant species, their purposes, gardening and more and says they are just as skilled as she is.

The students have also learned a lot about end of life services and received a lot of advice about life from residents, their families and other volunteers.

The students enjoyed their last day in the gardens on Friday making sure everything was left in perfect condition and saying their goodbyes to the many friends they have made at the hospice and St. Joseph's Lifecare Centre.

Cheryl Moore, executive director of the hospice said the three young people have worked extremely hard this year and she wanted to show the community that some youth are remarkable.

"These students have worked so hard and they deserve some recognition,” she said.

Leach said this isn't the only summer they have worked their hands to the grind stone. All three started three years ago when the gardens were created. Leach, a grade 12 student at Paris District High School and Boakes, a grade 12 student at Assumption College, helped bring in 125 tonnes of triple mix soil by wheelbarrow.

"We do almost everything by hand because we don't want to disturb the residents, so they worked really hard helping to make these gardens,” she said. "It's nice for them to be able to see their work blossom.”

Bains came later that summer and when she walked straight into a pond to help clean it Leach knew she was the right girl for the job.

Boakes said working at Stedman has made him very grateful for everything he has learned that has helped him become the person he is.

"We're lucky to have something so beautiful. People are lucky that when they aren't feeling well they can come out here and enjoy something so peaceful,” he said.

While Leach said he has learned a lot from the residents and other volunteers, some of which will stick with him for a long time.

"Something important for me, just to keep working hard and you'll, succeed,” he said.

Victoria Gray is a municipal affairs and general assignment reporter for Norfolk News. Contact Victoria at vgray@metroland.com. Follow The Norfolk News on Twitter, and Facebook
Hospice to open the 4 addtional beds

Hospice to open the 4 addtional beds
Published on Wednesday,17 August, 2016

The Stedman Community Hospice is getting $420,000 in annual funding from the province to open four additional beds at its new Hankinson House.

The announcement was made Tuesday morning by Ottawa South MPP John Fraser, parliamentary assistant to the Minister of Long-Term Care Eric Hoskins, who was joined by Brant MPP Dave Levac. Hankinson House had been receiving funding for six of its 10 beds.

The news was welcomed by Georgina Boutilier, who entered Hankinson House about three weeks ago because of her cancer.

"I think it's amazing," Boutilier said of the hospice in an interview.

"They're here for us, not them. Some people are in it for their jobs, but not these people. Everybody should die with dignity. I'm in a place where you feel it's about you."

Boutilier had fought pancreatic cancer in a successful operation that made her cancer free for five months. Then it was discovered the cancer had spread to her liver and she was given only a few months to live.

Now her goal is to make it to Nov. 9, so she and her husband, Roy, can celebrate their 25th anniversary together.

"I don't want to be greedy. Marriage is so hard today. To be married 25 years is a long time. I'm going to make it," she said.

"I'm determined."

Fraser told a gathering of nearly 40 people that the province is striving to increase funding for better palliative care.

"You want to make everything available that people need at the end of their lives," he said. "It is really critical."

He said that end of life care deserves the same kind of attention that the rest of it gets. "There are rest stations in life between Heaven and Earth and a hospice is an important one," he said.

Fraser said he was happy to announce the additional funding.

"I know it's something that will make a big difference to the community and families here."

Half of Hankinson House's residential space has sat empty since the $6.7-million building opened in 2014. Hankinson House, which fronts on Grey Street and sits on the property of St. Joseph's Lifecare Centre, was built for 10 residential hospice beds, despite approval from the ministry for only six.

Hospice officials had been hopeful for additional provincial funding.

"Anything that is worthwhile is worth fighting for," Levac told the gathering.

"We're a beacon to people in the province for hospice palliative care."

Michael Shea, chairman of the board for the Hamilton, Niagara, Haldimand Brant Local Health Integration Network, thanked the government for extending the extra funding.

"This marks another day of celebration," he said.

Cheryl Moore, the hospice's executive director, said the funding will help the facility deliver even better services.

"We offer so much more than end of life beds. We like to get involved as soon as there is a diagnosis. But we need those end of life beds. We will prove every day that this money is well used."

Hankinson House was built as a successor to the original Stedman hospice, also on the grounds of the lifecare centre, which opened in March 2006.

Construction of Hankinson House was funded entirely by community fundraising.

MMarion@postmedia.com

Twitter.com/EXPMarion
St. Joe's to open day wellness program

St. Joe's to open day wellness program
Published on Thursday,30 June, 2016

St. Joseph's Lifecare Centre is opening a day wellness program for seniors in September.

The program will be located in Stedman House on the centre's Wayne Gretzky Parkway property, city councillors were told this week.

The new program is among plans for St. Joseph's that were shared with councillors by Derrick Bernardo, the lifecare centre's president.

"The day wellness program will reach out to those seniors experiencing social isolation and those with mental-health problems," Bernardo said during a presentation.

"It will be able to accommodate up to 75 people each week. Programming will focus on nurturing the mind, body and soul."

Money to operate the program, which will cost $50,000 a year, will come for the first two years from the St. Joseph's Lifecare Foundation.

Stedman House is already home to kidney and continence care clinics, both of which serve residents of the St. Joseph's long-term care facility and the broader community, Bernardo said.

"Our goal is to bring care close to home."

St. Joseph's is exploring other potential uses for its property, which also is home to the Hankinson House hospice. Senior officials are looking at various options following a community health-care needs assessment, said Bernardo.

More than 30,000 people visited St. Joseph's for service other than long-term care in 2015, Bernardo told councillors.

Just over 100 patients were admitted to the hospice for care in 2015, while 79 new residents were admitted to the long-term care facility. There are 147 people on a wait list for long-term care beds at St. Joseph's.

More than 870 palliative care patients received treatment through the facility's outreach program and on site,

St. Joseph's offers 22 community services.

St. Joseph's also has introduced horticultural therapy and a new suite for medical students.

"To date, we have attracted five physicians to the lifecare centre and the ... hospice," Bernardo said.

"Our on-site physicians have taken a leadership role in educating and mentoring new doctors and medical students in the area of hospice, palliative, seniors and primary care."

Bernardo said the centre is looking for new ways to serve the community.

Vball@postmedia.com

twitter.com/EXPVBall
Page: « Previous 1 2 3 4 Next »